Angel Acres Horse Haven Rescue

Angel Acres Horse Haven Rescue
Angel Acres Website

Wednesday, January 28, 2009

New Bolton Behavior Lab...I tried for tickets...shot down, again...

Hey Guys, well I tried to get two tickets for us or another rescue to attend an event at New Bolton in March, like I had mentioned I would do if a good clinic was offered...unfortunately, New Bolton doesnt have the money to spare us two seats...we are sad, as this would have been a great learning experience us and/or another rescue....will try again next year (tried last year too and they didnt have the space or funds available last year either) :o(

TEXT OF MY EMAILS AND DETAILS OF EVENT POSTED BELOW, IF ANYONE WOULD LIKE TO ATTEND AND THEN FILL US IN ON HOW IT WENT, WE WOULD APPRECIATE IT!



Hi Jo,

For as much as we’d love to donate the course tuition, we’re also non-profit and we use the money to upgrade equipment, etc.
Also, the courses typically fill in quickly.

But… Thank you for your interest and good works!

If you are interested in some of Dr. McDonnell’s Behavior work, please check out her web site:
http://www3.vet.upenn.edu/labs/equinebehavior/Index.html.

Thank you





Hi,

We were wondering if you offered a discounted rate for reg 501c3 non profit horse rescue groups?

We cannot afford to spend the $900 (that would save two horses from slaughter) to attend...but would love to attend at least one of the sessions...would New Bolton donate a ticket or a pair for a rescue? If not our rescue, there are other worthy groups that would benefit from these sessions, I am sure!

Thank you for taking the time to read my email,

Jo :o)

The Havemeyer Equine Behavior Lab & the Section of Reproduction at the University of Pennsylvania , New Bolton Center are presenting 2 short courses:
· Just Stallion Handling, March 9-10, 2009: Two-day Course for Veterinarians, Stallion Owners and Managers. Focusing on Concepts and Skills for Safe, Efficient Handling and General Management of Breeding Stallions
· Mare & Foal - Care & Behavior, March 13 & 14, 2009: Two-day Course for Owners, Breeding Farm Managers, and Veterinarians

o 16 Hours Continuing Education Curriculum per short course
o Each short course: Tuition is $500 for Day 1 only, $900 for 2 days. Limited seats.
o Courses begin at 8 am and runs through late afternoon.

These courses fill quickly, so register early. Registration page and instructions: http://www3.vet.upenn.edu/labs/equinebehavior/ShortCourses/ShortCourseRegistration.htm

Registration Questions: Contact Cheryl O'Sullivan at 610-925-6203 / cherylo@vet.upenn.edu
Course Content Questions: Contact Dr. Sue McDonnell 610-925-6221/ suemcd@vet.upenn.edu

(35 mi west of Philadelphia Int’l Airport , 80 mi north of Baltimore Washington Int’l Airport )

More Info: http://www3.vet.upenn.edu/labs/equinebehavior/ShortCourses/ShortCourseHome.htm

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Just Stallion Handling
March 9-10, 2009

Day 1
Dr. Sue McDonnell, Course Planner
The Basics of Stallion Restraint. Stallion Handling for Natural Cover. The Basics of Mare Restraint.
Stallion Handling for Dummies (Dummy Mounts). Pasture Breeding. Lessons from Free-Running Equids (Including a Tour of a Semi-Feral Herd).
Hands-On Stallion Handling Opportunity . Individualized Coaching on Stallion Handling.

Day 2
Dr. Sue McDonnell, Course Planner
Breeding Shed Layout and Equipment. Starting a Novice. How to Correct Biting, Rearing, Charging, and Other Bad Habits in the Breeding Shed.
Tips and Tricks For Handling the Older or Disabled Stallion. Tips and Tricks for Working with Limited Personnel.
Common Breeding Behavior and Fertility Problems of Stallions. Hands-On Stallion Handling Opportunity . Individualized Coaching on Stallion Handling.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Mare & Foal - Care & Behavior
March 13 & 14, 2009

Day 1
Dr. Patricia Sertich, Course Planner
Care of the pregnant mare. Understand the changes your mare is experiencing, When will she foal? Signs of impending parturition.
Tools to help you catch the big event. Review of the normal events of delivery. Examination of the afterbirth-the mirror of fetal life. Induction of parturition. You have waited 11 long months, what is the rush? Dystocia. What can go wrong and what you can do until your veterinarian gets there.
Care of the post parturient mare. How to spot serious life threatening problems. High risk pregnant mares. Health care of the foal.

Day 2
Dr. Sue McDonnell, Course Planner
Reproduction of equids under natural conditions, including normal behavior of the pregnant and foaling mare and foal development.
Maternal behavior and bonding problems and solutions. Raising an orphan foal. Normal behavioral development of the foal.
Early intensive handling of foals. Least stress weaning methods. Raising the user-friendly foal and horse.

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Tristan!


Tristan in his new home!

He was adopted over the weekend and is now living in Missouri with his new mom, Jessica.

Doesn't he look handsome in western wear!

Will update with more pics and details soon!

Saturday, January 10, 2009

Cranberry Run Farm PRO SLAUGHTER...

THIS WAS FORWARDED TO ME BY ONE OF OUR READERS...(I am not shocked, but after thorough review of the web site that the poster of this response owns/hosts there is NO indication of her pro slaughter stance)...I feel that if you are pro slaughter, you need to say so on your site and I dont dig being misled.

I was so suprised by what I read from Tracey (pro slaughter poster) that I had to ask for the original emails back and forth between the two to ensure accuracy...so...without boring you with details...our reader decided to take a few mins from their busy day to contact this person to let them know that it is pretty risky giving a horse away (she was giving the horse away via dream horse). That the horse may end up for slaughter or worse...and I read the email from our friend and she was polite and not rude.

This is the reply she received from Tracey at Cranberry Run Farm.


I AM WELL AWARE OF HOW THE SLAUGHTER MARKET WORKS. I AM ALSO AWARE THAT HORSES ARE LIVESTOCK AND NOT " DOMESTIC PETS ". AS WITH MY CATTLE, CHICKENS, ETC. THEY ARE PROPERLY TAKEN CARE OF, UNTIL IT IS TIME FOR THEM TO BECOME MY DINNER.

I DO BELIEVE THE KILL BUYERS ARE NEEDED AND PROVIDE AN IMPORTANT SERVICE. THERE IS NO NEED TO WASTE OUR VALUABLE GREENLAND ON A NASTY PIECE OF TRASH. I DO TAKE MY TRASH AND NO LONGER USEFUL FOR THE PURPOSE INTENDED TO SALES. INFACT, I SENT A PONY TO AUCTION LAST NIGHT. HE BROUGHT LESS THAN $100 IN THE RING, SO I ASSUME HE IS GOING TO A MINK FARMER. HE WAS KICKED HIS LAST PERSON, WHEN HE KICKED ME.

I GET DOZENS OF RACE HORSES EVERY YEAR. I PROVIDE A SERVICE TO THE TRAINERS AT MANY DIFFERENT TRACKS. THE HORSES ARE TURNED OVER TO ME AND I HAVE TO DECIDE IF IT IS WORTHY OF A SECOND CHANCE. MANY OF MY EX RACERS DO GET SECOND CAREERS, BUT THE TRASH GETS SENT TO THE SALES. SOMETIMES EVEN THE GOOD ONES END UP AT SALES. I GIVE THEM A 30 DAY GET OUT OF JAIL CARD. IF I CANT GET THEM SOLD, AND MOST ARE SOLD VERY CHEAP, THEN THEY GO TO AUCTION TO MAKE ROOM FOR THE NEXT GROUP.

I DO NEED TO COVER MY EXPENSES, WHICH MEANS I NEED TO TURN THEM OVER QUICKLY. MY HORSE CUSTOMERS ARE TREATED THE SAME AS MY CATTLE CUSTOMERS. I DONT HARASS THEM AND I DONT TELL THEM WHAT TO DO WITH THEIR PURCHASE. IF SOMEONE WANTS TO KEEP A BLACK ANGUS AS A PET, WELL THATS ON THEM, BUT IT IS NOT FOR ME TO SAY ONCE THEY HAVE PAID FOR IT.
HERE IS SOME FOOD FOR THOUGHT FOR YOU. OUR DOGS AND CATS WERE NOT BEING POISONED, WHEN WE WERE FEEDING THEM HORSE MEAT. SINCE THE HORSE MEAT HAS BEEN REPLACED WITH A BUNCH OF IMPORTED FILLERS " IE RICE PROTEIN ".

WE ARE NOW KILLING OUR OWN PETS.

OUR ECONOMY IS IN THE TOILET, THE UNEMPLOYMENT IS OUT OF CONTROL, AND WE HAVE PEOPLE GOING TO BED HUNGRY. WE ARE SENDING OUR LIVESTOCK " HORSES" OUT OF THE COUNTRY, SO WE CAN BUY BACK THE FINISHED PRODUCT ( IE LEATHER ). WHAT THE HELL, HAVE WE ALL LOST OUR MINDS.
SINCERELY,
TRACEY WICHROWSKI
CRANBERRY RUN FARM

From an August Post about a Pony:

HELLO EVERYONE,I AM OFFERING ONE OF MY PUREBRED CHINCOTEAGUE PONY BROODMARES FREE TO ANYONE WHO IS INTERESTED IN HER. PATTY IS A 5 Y/O 13 HAND BAY AND WHITE PINTO. SHE DOES HAVE STIFLE ISSUES, WHICH MAKES HER UNSUITABLE FOR RIDING PURPOSES, BUT SHE IS FINE TO LEAD THE LITTLE ONES AROUND FOR THE OCCASIONAL PONY RIDE. SHE IS KID SAFE AND KID FRIENDLY. SHE DOES BEST TURNED OUT, WITH HER STIFLE PROBLEM. SHE IS UTD ON SHOTS AND FARRIER, BUT DOES NOT HAVE A CURRENT COGGINS. THIS IS A FREE PONY, SO IF YOU WANT A COGGINS IT WILL BE AT YOUR EXPENSE. SHE BE AVAILABLE TO THE FIRST PERSON WHO SHOWS UP WITH A TRAILER OR UNTIL I MAKE MY NEXT NEW HOLLAND RUN.
PLEASE CALL ME ON MY CELL FOR FURTHER INFORMATION:
609 217 1812
TRACEY WICHROWSKI
http://www.cranberryrunfarm.com/

The Story on Baby New Year...By Fran Burns

Todays Video of Baby New Year...our New Years' Eve starvation surrender...


video

This is the story on Baby New Year by our volunteer, Fran Burns.


Just a normal Tuesday afternoon or so I thought!

On Tuesday afternoon around 4 as I was heading home from visiting my mom in the hospital I received a call from Jo Deibel of Angel Acres Horse Haven Rescue. She had been contacted by a young man named Tom. Upon the recommendation of the ladies at The Mill of Hereford he had contacted Jo re a neglected and starving thoroughbred at a farm on Mt. Carmel Rd. He needed someone to come immediately as he didn’t think the mare was going to make it. Tom has been working for the last several weeks to convince the owners to do the right thing and give the horse to someone who could help care for the mare.

Jo was tied up in Pa. and ironically I was on 83 just shy of the Mt Carmel Rd. exit when she called and asked me to help. Tom and I connected via cell phone and he met me at the property. What I saw was by far the worst living situation for people and animals. I had no idea that conditions like that could ever exist especially within 10 minutes of my house.

We found the mare in the back of what was laughingly called a pasture- a muddy lot/wooded area with probably 8 other ponies and all were eating horse poop. The ponies looked a bit better than this mare but their long shaggy hair and muddy legs covered them up. The mare in my estimate was a 2 (Jo said later I was way too generous) on a body mass scale and seemed depressed. She is probably about 15.2, bay with a very sweet face with bones sticking out everywhere. Tom just put a blanket on her that day. I couldn’t tell her age real well due to her condition but she had ulcers in her mouth. Tom told me the other horse had died a week ago and that he convinced them to surrender the horse as it was going to die too.

I called everyone I knew as the Angel Acres Trucks (all 2 of them) are broken down right now. We needed a trailer fast before these folks changed their mind and the horse died. Thankfully Connie, my neighbor, responded. We spent 30 minutes trying to get her loaded. Right when we just about got her on the owner decided that we “weren’t takin’ her horse tonight- the son in law would take her in the morning.”

Beyond frustration and covered in mud Connie and I left but Tom continued to make sure they lived up to their word.

Yesterday morning I got a call while in the CCU with my mom from Tom who said the horse was loaded up and they wanted to know where to go. We made arrangements for Patty (Jo’s rescue partner) to meet them at the Rutter’s on Middletown Rd. and then they followed to the Angel Acres Farm. Jim, the son in law, gave Jo the horse’s papers and she then learned they had the horse for 2 years.

Her name is now Baby New Year- she is 19. Apparently she was “given” to these folks 2 yrs ago after having a foal at age 17. She is by Nostrum and probably was lovely when in good condition.

Angel Acres is working to bring her back to health. She could be a very nice companion horse when her health indicates she is ready. She has been evaluated by Dr. Trevor Wells and we are awaiting his report.

Animal Control visited the site. As of last Saturday we understand that their vet had put 2 of the ponies down due to neglect and malnutrition.

Last Updated January 10, 2009

Tuesday, January 6, 2009

Baby New Year!

Update on Baby New Year:

Baby New Year was seen by our vet, Dr. Trevor Wells, and is a 1.5 on the equine body scale.

She is in very bad shape, but has a spark in her and I am wondering if she isnt going to be a firecracker when she recovers!

More pics to be added soon...

Please keep her in your thoughts...

Thursday, January 1, 2009

Baby New Year

THIS IS BABY NEW YEAR...

A 19 year old Thoroughbred mare (who had a foal in April of 2006) that is less than a 2 on the scale...she was rescued from starvation...she is covered in rain rot, her mouth is full of ulcers, she is WAY underweight, her coat is matted (the parts not covered in rain rot), she is extremely wormy, and on and on and on...

We will update soon...we are callling her Baby New Year because her life was almost over and now she will have a new lease on life, thanks to the diligent efforts of Tom of Monkton and the Angel Acres volunteers!


Fran will be posting her blog update on this mare soon...via a letter to the ladies who got Tom in contact with us...